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A Roundup of Our Best-Loved Spring Nature Crafts

Don’t you just love this time of year? Here in Colorado, March tends to be more of a battle between winter and spring, as the first flowers bravely peek out from fresh waves of snow.

Nature crafts are a fun way to celebrate the new season while we wait for things outdoors to thaw. I’ve put together a roundup of some of the springtime activities the kids and I have done over the years, and I hope you enjoy them as much as we did!

caterpillar craft

Swallowtail Caterpillar Playdough

ย Check out this post on how to make a Swallowtail Caterpillar out of playdough.

Spring Flower Sun Catchers

These pretty sun catchers are so easy to make with pressed flowers and contact paper.

Nature Caterpillars

How sweet are these fuzzy little caterpillars?! All you need is playdough and fresh flowers.

Nature Moths

Just gather leaves and spring flowers from your yard to make these sweet moths (or butterflies).

Salt Dough and Seed Garden Art

This was a fun (although messy) project for livening up the wall in our garden. Check out my favorite salt dough recipe here.

Nests and Painted Wooden Eggs

This was a fun way to study nesting birds, while also adding a sweet display to our spring nature table.

Flower Tea and Mud Kitchen Play

Flower tea is so simple, yet hours of fun. Pick some flowers from the yard, fill some kitchen pans with water and you’re good to go!

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Spring Pond Sensory Tray

We love kinetic sand, and this pond sensory tray setup did not disappoint – such a fun way to learn about frogs.

It’s not too late to grab your Spring Journal! Over 50 pages of spring unit studies, journaling pages, phenology wheels and more.

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Salt-Dough Nature Pendants

The boys and I needed a handcraft to make for the Wild + Free handicraft fair and this was the perfect little project. While I plan on teaching my boys practical handcrafts – like sewing and woodworking – this time I needed something simple enough that my three year old could participate in.

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Salt-dough is such a neat medium to work with and very easy to mix up (my favorite recipe is below). We used cookie cutters to cut out the pendants and nature treasures from our nature collection to use as stamps.

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Straws work perfectly to make holes for stringing the pendants into necklaces.

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Once the pendants were all designed, we let them dry. Air drying is an option, but we were in a bit of a time crunch so we dried ours in the oven. We placed them on a parchment paper lined cookie sheet and dried them at 200 degrees for an hour on both sides. Then we left them on the counter overnight to completely dry out before painting.

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Both of the boys got a paintbrush and some acrylic paint and painted the nature impressions, leaving the rest white. (You can also use watercolors or even crayons)

Once the paint was dry, I went ahead and brushed on a coat of clear polycrylic. Then, the boys strung some colorful beads onto a string and through the hole in the pendants. I tied them off and viola!

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These would also make sweet little gifts for Christmas or birthdays.

Salt-Dough Recipe

2 cups of flour

1 cup of salt

1 cup of water

Thoroughly mix the first two ingredients together. Gradually stir in the water bit by bit, until you get a dough-like consistency. Form it into a ball and knead on a floured surface for 5 minutes. (If the dough gets too sticky, add some more flour.) Roll the dough out to about 1/4-inch thickness before cutting out the pendants with cookie cutters.